Creeping/Crawling

Creeping/Crawling

4 May, 2020

Transitional gross-motor milestones – part 2

Last week I discussed rolling, the first movement transition. Once your baby has mastered this skill, they tend to spend more time on their tummy as they can move so freely. Now babies quickly start to move. Often the first way babies learn to get around is by creeping, or pulling themselves along on their tummy. Then, as their arm and leg strength increases, they will push up into all fours. From here they will learn to move in and out of different positions such as sitting…the next transitions.
The timing of this often coincides with babies being able to sit up independently, due in part to the increased upper body strength they have gained from spending more time on their tummies. From sitting it is then easier to move onto all fours…another transition.
Tummy time is the first place to start:
Once your baby has mastered the transition to all fours:
” } },{ “@type”: “Question”, “name”: “What do I do if my baby doesn’t transition into different positions?”, “acceptedAnswer”: { “@type”: “Answer”, “text”: “Babies develop skills using different methods and on their own timetable. If your child hasn’t shown an interest in moving by some means (whether by creeping, crawling, rolling, or scooting on their bottom), figured out how to get from sitting to the floor, or from sitting to standing by age 10-12 months, speak to your doctor or paediatric physiotherapist. Always keep in mind that babies work to their own timetable and as long as their movements are progressing, just keep encouraging them.” } },{ “@type”: “Question”, “name”: “What’s next after my baby gets into all fours/crawls?”, “acceptedAnswer”: { “@type”: “Answer”, “text”: “Once your baby has mastered the transition of moving in and out of all fours and crawling, they are on their way to complete mobility….walking.” } }] }
Creeping/Crawling 6-7 months
Often the first movement on a baby’s tummy is creeping, also known as commando crawling…this is moving with their tummies still on the floor.
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Crawling 7-8 months

As babies’ confidence and strength improve, they push up into all fours and start to experiment with movement, such as rocking backwards and forwards, and develop increased control of moving one leg at a time.
It has been found since the “Back to Sleep” campaign in the early 90s many babies seem to be crawling later and a few skip it completely. They may skip it opting instead to “scoot” on their bottom, creep, roll, etc as a way to get around. As long as a baby is using arms and legs equally on both sides of their body, tolerating their tummies, and moving in and out of positions, there is usually nothing to worry about.
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8-10 months

This is the period of development where babies master many of their transitions (movement in and out of positions).
Babies will begin to adopt other all four positions (i.e. the bear stand), will be climbing up stairs on all fours, or bear walking. This is a wonderful stage where babies are highly motivated to move, explore, and learn all about their environment.
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FAQs

Why is moving into all fours important?

I am frequently asked that question as since the advent of the “Back to Sleep” Campaign I’ve seen many babies who get “stuck” in sitting and/or don’t like their tummies. The transition from tummy to all fours or sit to all fours is necessary so that your baby can then move from all fours up to stand! This initially is on furniture and then independently in the middle of the room. Even if a baby doesn’t crawl, and some don’t, they need to be able to get up from the floor if they fall and they do this by getting into all fours.
 

How do I get my baby into all fours?

Tummy time is the first place to start:
Once your baby has mastered the transition to all fours:
 

What do I do if my baby doesn’t transition into different positions?

Babies develop skills using different methods and on their own timetable. If your child hasn’t shown an interest in moving by some means (whether by creeping, crawling, rolling, or scooting on their bottom), figured out how to get from sitting to the floor, or from sitting to standing by age 10-12 months, speak to your doctor or paediatric physiotherapist. Always keep in mind that babies work to their own timetable and as long as their movements are progressing, just keep encouraging them.
 

What’s next after my baby gets into all fours/crawls?

Once your baby has mastered the transition of moving in and out of all fours and crawling, they are on their way to complete mobility….walking.
 
Stay safe, well, and healthy.
Deb
By Kristy Allison
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